Pest animals

Many non-native or introduced vertebrate animals have become established as unmanaged or feral populations across Australia. These animals have become pests locally or over wider areas. The reasons why they are pests include:

  • preying on domestic or farm animals
  • damaging crops and food production
  • posing a threat to native animals and ecosystems
  • being a nuisance and health hazard to people.

Some commonly kept animals have the potential to become pests if they are not managed or kept under licence or conditions. Some native animals are also potential pests in certain situations.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development manages pests in Western Australia through policy development, risk assessment, research and development, provision of technical advice and information, implementation of regulation, emergency response, property inspections, industry liaison, and the planning and coordination of significant species control/eradication programs.

For advice on pest animals search our website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • Many non-native or introduced exotic animals (mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians) have established feral populations in Western Australia, and have become pests as they cause damage to agricul

  • A number of starlings have recently been detected along the State's south coast. This article provides information on the identification, biology, impact and management of the common starling.

  • This animal pest alert provides information on the identification, biology, and pest potential of the red-whiskered bulbul in Australia.

  • This animal pest alert provides information on the identification, biology, and pest potential of the Barbary dove in Australia.

  • This animal pest alert provides information on the identification, biology, and pest potential of the common myna in Australia.

  • This article provides information about management of rainbow lorikeets to reduce the damage they often cause in southern Western Australia.

  • This article provides information on the identification, biology, and pest potential of the sulphur-crested cockatoo in the south-west of Western Australia.

  • This animal pest alert provides information on the identification, biology, and pest potential of the house crow in Australia.

  • This article provides information on the identification, biology, and pest potential of sparrows in Western Australia.

  • This web page is part of the Bait and poison directory for vertebrate pests in Western Australia.