Diseases

Diseases have a detrimental effect on plants and animals and impact on market access and agricultural production. Diseases include micro-organisms, disease agents (bacteria, fungi and viruses), infectious agents, parasites and genetic disorders.

Western Australia is free from some of the world's major agricultural and livestock diseases. Biosecurity measures on your property are vital in preventing the spread of diseases.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development provides:

  • biosecurity/quarantine measures at the WA border to prevent the entry of plant and animal diseases
  • post border biosecurity measures for harmful animal and plant diseases
  • advice on widespread diseases present in the state.

For advice on animal and plant diseases search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  •  Potato spindle tuber viroid can reduce crop yields in potatoes and tomatoes. Use certified disease-free planting material and destroy infected plant material.

  • Onion smut (Urocystis cepulae) is a disease of onions. This disease is absent from Western Australia.

  • Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a very damaging virus disease of tomato crops in tropical and warm temperate regions of the world, causing losses of up to 100%.

  • Late blight (Phytophthora infestans) is considered the most devastating disease of potatoes worldwide and caused the Irish potato famine in the 1840s.

  • Bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum) is a serious disease of potatoes that can cause crop losses of more than 90%.

  • Potato virus Y tuber necrosis strain (PVYNTN) causes a serious disease of potatoes called potato tuber necrotic ringspot disease which results in dark unsightly rings on tubers.

  • Onion rust (Puccinia allii) is a disease of plants in the onion family, including onions, garlic, chives, spring onions and leeks.

  • Cavity spot disease reduces the quality of carrots so that they become unacceptable for local and export markets. Information about this disease and its control are provided.

  • Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum is a bacterial plant pathogen that is exotic to Australia. Currently five haplotypes have been described: haplotypes A and B from solanaceous crops suc

  • Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum is an exotic pest to Australia. It can affect both solanaceous and apiaceous crops.