Diseases

Diseases have a detrimental effect on plants and animals and impact on market access and agricultural production. Diseases include micro-organisms, disease agents (bacteria, fungi and viruses), infectious agents, parasites and genetic disorders.

Western Australia is free from some of the world's major agricultural and livestock diseases. Biosecurity measures on your property are vital in preventing the spread of diseases.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development provides:

  • biosecurity/quarantine measures at the WA border to prevent the entry of plant and animal diseases
  • post border biosecurity measures for harmful animal and plant diseases
  • advice on widespread diseases present in the state.

For advice on animal and plant diseases search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • This series of video tutorials has been produced to provide advice about the best ways to monitor and sample crops to diagnose and overcome constraints to crop production.

  • Determining the relative yield loss (tolerance) of commonly grown and newly released oat varieties to crown rot pathogens Fusarium pseudograminearum and F. culmorum.

  • Oat leaves displaying water soaked appearance with red-brown longitudinal stripes typical of stripe blight

    There are two types of bacterial disease which infect oat foliage; halo (Pseudomonas syringae pv. coronafaciens) and stripe (Pseudomonas syringae pv. striafaciens) blight.

  • At head emergence, each grain is replaced by brown to black powdery spores

    Loose smut (Ustilago avenae) and covered smut (Ustilago hordei) of oats are both externally seed- borne diseases with similar symptoms which are difficult to distinguish in the fi

  • Straw or brown colour spots surrounded by a yellow water-soaked halo than may resemble septoria

    There are two types of bacterial disease which infect oat foliage; halo blight (Pseudomonas syringae pv. coronafaciens) and stripe blight (Pseudomonas syringae pv.

  • Management of weeds, disease and nitrogen nutrition are ongoing challenges that limit yield potential.

  • Information is provided here to assist management of diseases and viruses that occur in broadacre crops grown in Western Australia - cereals (wheat, barley, oats and triticale), pulses (field pea,

  • Nematodes can feed on root tissues of a wide range of plant species and lead to root damage which can result in significant crop yield loss.

  • Affected plants stunted with stiff, rolled leaves, which are sometimes darker than those of healthy plants.

    A widespread root disease caused by a soil-borne fungus and generating yield losses of 1-5% in Western Australia each year.

  • Roots stunted, short and stubby with few laterals.

    A widespread fungal root disease that attacks seedlings but which rarely causes large yield losses.