Diseases

Diseases have a detrimental effect on plants and animals and impact on market access and agricultural production. Diseases include micro-organisms, disease agents (bacteria, fungi and viruses), infectious agents, parasites and genetic disorders.

Western Australia is free from some of the world's major agricultural and livestock diseases. Biosecurity measures on your property are vital in preventing the spread of diseases.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development provides:

  • biosecurity/quarantine measures at the WA border to prevent the entry of plant and animal diseases
  • post border biosecurity measures for harmful animal and plant diseases
  • advice on widespread diseases present in the state.

For advice on animal and plant diseases search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • Presentations on recent activities of the national project, Pests and diseases of truffles and their host trees in Australia, were given at the Australian Truffle Grower Association (ATGA) annual c

  • Grapevine leafroll-associated viruses (GLRaV) are a significant problem for grape growing regions worldwide.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development has taken action to protect Western Australia’s citrus growers from the threat of citrus canker following confirmation that the disease

  • Brown spot is a fungal disease caused by Nothophoma quercina. It affects jujubes in Western Australia and has been reported in olives, pistachios and Chinese quince in other countries.

  • Dickeya dianthicola is a serious bacterium that can cause tuber soft rot and blackleg in potatoes, and can also affect some ornamental varieties, chicory and artichoke.

  • Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum is an exotic pest to Australia. It can affect both solanaceous and apiaceous crops.

  • Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum is a bacterial plant pathogen that is exotic to Australia. Currently five haplotypes have been described: haplotypes A and B from solanaceous crops suc

  • The department is reviewing its policy in regards to the import of washed ware potatoes from other Australian states and territories.

  • White rot of Allium species (caused by Sclerotium cepivorum) has been confirmed in garlic from a Perth backyard and a property in the Swan Valley.

  • The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia has initiated a policy review for Panama disease associated with host material and linked packaging imported from other Australian states a

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