Diseases

Diseases have a detrimental effect on plants and animals and impact on market access and agricultural production. Diseases include micro-organisms, disease agents (bacteria, fungi and viruses), infectious agents, parasites and genetic disorders.

Western Australia is free from some of the world's major agricultural and livestock diseases. Biosecurity measures on your property are vital in preventing the spread of diseases.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development provides:

  • biosecurity/quarantine measures at the WA border to prevent the entry of plant and animal diseases
  • post border biosecurity measures for harmful animal and plant diseases
  • advice on widespread diseases present in the state.

For advice on animal and plant diseases search our website, the Western Australian Organism List or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

For diagnostic services, please contact our Diagnostic Laboratory Services.

Articles

  • Following extensive surveillance throughout the north-west at the end of 2018, which showed no additional detections of citrus canker, residents in the Restricted Areas in Kununurra and Wyndham can

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development has taken action to protect Western Australia’s citrus growers from the threat of citrus canker.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development has taken action to protect Western Australia’s citrus growers from the threat of citrus canker following confirmation that the disease

  • The Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 requires that certain diseases must be reported to the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) if they are kno

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) has been conducting a three and a half-year project to strengthen the State’s biosecurity defences and underpin efforts by indu

  • More than 60 livestock industries and government representatives joined forces on 2 May 2014 in Perth to work through their respective sectors’ preparedness to communicate and implement a national

  • If an emergency animal disease such as foot-and-mouth disease was found in Australia, a national livestock standstill would be implemented immediately.

  • A national livestock standstill is when it is nationally agreed that specific livestock species affected by an emergency disease must not be moved.

  • Early recognition of disease is one of the most important factors influencing the control of disease and the reduction of its impact on industry and the community.

  • Following diagnosis or strong suspicion of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), state and territory governments will implement a livestock standstill across Australia, including in unaffected regions.