Control methods

Pests, weeds and diseases (pests) pose serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production. Pest control is best achieved with an Integrated Pest Management plan using a range of biological, chemical, mechanical, physical or cultural control methods.

To reduce the impacts of pests, the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development:

  • works with landholders and grower/community/biosecurity groups on control
  • provides diagnostic services and information on prevention, management and treatment
  • provides biosecurity measures to prevent introduction, and to eradicate or manage current pests.

For advice on control methods search our website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • Not all insects and pathogens are harmful to plants in the garden, many are beneficial and feed on other organisms and prevent them from becoming pests. 

  • These days with concerns about the environment and their own health, many people are preferring natural alternatives over synthetic chemicals.

  • When the garden suffers a severe disease or an insect infestation, it is tempting to seek a quick fix by turning to synthetic chemicals.

  • Bindii weed, onehunga (pronounced oh-nee-hunga after a New Zealand Maori place name) and jo-jo are alternative names for a troublesome lawn weed (Soliva pterosperma) which is now widesprea

  • The failure of citrus trees to produce a satisfactory crop of fruit even though blossom has been abundant, and the initial set of fruit is apparently normal, 

  • Phytophthora root rot is the most common soil-borne disease causing plant death in native cutflower production.

  • What you need to know about controlling aquatic weeds on your property.

  • Herbicides are extensively used to control declared plants.

  • Pesticide-treated seed and structural treatments to grain storage and handling areas may leave chemical residues in cereals, pulses and oilseeds unless managed effectively. Treated grain storage an

  • The Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) has amended the registration of 2,4-D High Volatile Ester (HVE) herbicides.

Filter by search

Filter by topic