Control methods

Pests, weeds and diseases (pests) pose serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production. Pest control is best achieved with an Integrated Pest Management plan using a range of biological, chemical, mechanical, physical or cultural control methods.

To reduce the impacts of pests, the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development:

  • works with landholders and grower/community/biosecurity groups on control
  • provides diagnostic services and information on prevention, management and treatment
  • provides biosecurity measures to prevent introduction, and to eradicate or manage current pests.

For advice on control methods search our website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • Options for control of winter broad leaved weeds, in pastures, is a common inquiry. A fairly reliable method is spray grazing.

  • In Western Australia, competition from 7-90 capeweed plants per square metre in a wheat crop can reduce crop yield by 28-44% and net return by 25-76%.

  • This article contains the booklet '1080 landholder information' and provides a general summary of a landholder’s obligations under the code of practice for the saf

  • Permits are required for landholders to possess and use registered S7 pesticides such as 1080, PAPP or strychnine products for vertebrate animal control on leasehold or freehold land.

  • This management strategy provides an opportunity to control weed seed set in the pasture and during harvest.

  • Doublegee or spiny emex is a significant weed in Western Australia. It is a vigorous annual herb with a strong tap root and a long, fleshy, hairless stem.

  • Herbicide resistance is the inherited ability of an individual plant to survive a herbicide application that would kill a normal population of the same species.

  • Cereal smut and bunt diseases are caused by fungi which parasitise the host plant and produce masses of soot-like spores in the leaves, grains or ears.

  • This fact sheet has been prepared to provide information about a new barley leaf rust pathotype detected in Western Australia in 2016.

  • Barley leaf disease management options supported by the latest research findings are shown here.

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