Control methods

Pests, weeds and diseases (pests) pose serious risk for primary producers as they can impact on market access and agricultural production. Pest control is best achieved with an Integrated Pest Management plan using a range of biological, chemical, mechanical, physical or cultural control methods.

To reduce the impacts of pests, the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development:

  • works with landholders and grower/community/biosecurity groups on control
  • provides diagnostic services and information on prevention, management and treatment
  • provides biosecurity measures to prevent introduction, and to eradicate or manage current pests.

For advice on control methods search our website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • Beneficials are insects and pathogens that kill crop pests, they are also referred to as 'natural enemies' or 'biological control agents' of pests.

  • Strychnine is a highly poisonous substance that can only be used for control of pest emus and wild dogs.

  • Most bait products registered for use on wild dogs in WA use sodium fluoroacetate (1080) as their active ingredient. Landholders have certain obligations under the code of practice for the safe use

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) has commenced the extension of the State Barrier Fence eastwards from its current termination point near Ravensthorpe, extendin

  • Maintaining feed-on-offer at around 2 t DM/ha for four weeks around the Timerite® date in spring can effectively control RLEM in the following growing season.

  • The following article provides information on spraying and withholding periods for the Australian plague locust.

  • A list of current Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 management plans in Western Australia.

  • This article contains useful information about Paterson's curse (Echium plantagineum), how to identify it and biological control agents.

  • Windmill grass (Chloris truncata) is a native species and is the tenth most common summer weed species in the Western Australian wheatbelt.

  • Annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) is one of the most serious and costly weeds of annual winter cropping systems in southern Australia.

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