Mechanical, physical and cultural

Mechanical, physical and cultural control of pests, weeds and diseases (pests) are an integral part of a successful Integrated Pest Management plan.

Cultural controls are practices that reduce pest establishment, reproduction, dispersal, and survival. For example, crop rotation - replacing a susceptible crop with a less susceptible crop; and changing irrigation practices - less watering can reduce root disease and weeds.

Mechanical and physical controls kill a pest directly or make the environment unsuitable for it. For example, traps - for pest animals and insects; mulches - for weed management; steam sterilisation - for soil disease management; or barriers - such as screens or fences to keep animals and insects out.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development:

  • works with landholders and grower/community/biosecurity groups on control
  • provides diagnostic services and information on prevention, management and treatment
  • provides biosecurity measures to prevent introduction, and to eradicate or manage current pests

For advice on control methods search our website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • Stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) is a foliar disease that can significantly reduce wheat yields if it occurrs in early spring and is not controlled.

  • Control methods for two-leaf cape tulip (Moraea miniata) a declared pest in Western Australia.

  • Control methods for one-leaf cape tulip (Moraea flaccida, previously Homeria flaccida).

  • This article describes the use of fencing to protect crops and pasture from rabbits in bush remnants.

  • Barley leaf disease management options supported by the latest research findings are shown here.

  • Nematodes can feed on root tissues of a wide range of plant species and lead to root damage which can result in significant crop yield loss.

  • Weeds sprayed with a sub-lethal dose of a phenoxy, hormone-type herbicide appear to become more palatable to stock.

  • Control methods for variegated thistle (Silybum marianum) a declared pest in Western Australia.

  • These days with concerns about the environment and their own health, many people are preferring natural alternatives over synthetic chemicals.

  • Bindii weed, onehunga (pronounced oh-nee-hunga after a New Zealand Maori place name) and jo-jo are alternative names for a troublesome lawn weed (Soliva pterosperma) which is now widesprea

Filter by search

Filter by topic