Mechanical, physical and cultural

Mechanical, physical and cultural control of pests, weeds and diseases (pests) are an integral part of a successful Integrated Pest Management plan.

Cultural controls are practices that reduce pest establishment, reproduction, dispersal, and survival. For example, crop rotation - replacing a susceptible crop with a less susceptible crop; and changing irrigation practices - less watering can reduce root disease and weeds.

Mechanical and physical controls kill a pest directly or make the environment unsuitable for it. For example, traps - for pest animals and insects; mulches - for weed management; steam sterilisation - for soil disease management; or barriers - such as screens or fences to keep animals and insects out.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development:

  • works with landholders and grower/community/biosecurity groups on control
  • provides diagnostic services and information on prevention, management and treatment
  • provides biosecurity measures to prevent introduction, and to eradicate or manage current pests

For advice on control methods search our website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) has commenced the extension of the State Barrier Fence eastwards from its current termination point near Ravensthorpe, extendin

  • Landholders planning to grow broadacre, horticulture or tree crops or to preserve native vegetation need to control rabbits first. This article provides information about options for rabbit control

  • This article provides information on control options for rabbits in urban and semi-urban areas in Western Australia.

  • This article provides information about rabbit warren and harbourage destruction.

  • Feral pigs are declared pests in Western Australia. This article provides information on controlling feral pigs by trapping.

  • Big improvements in wild dog management and agricultural pest animal control resulted from Royalties for Regions funds allocated in 2010 and 2011.

  • Persons in built up areas or special rural zones planning to trap declared vertebrate pests, using means other than cage traps, must apply for a permit from the Department of Agriculture and Food,

  • This article describes the use of fencing to protect crops and pasture from rabbits in bush remnants.