Mechanical, physical and cultural

Mechanical, physical and cultural control of pests, weeds and diseases (pests) are an integral part of a successful Integrated Pest Management plan.

Cultural controls are practices that reduce pest establishment, reproduction, dispersal, and survival. For example, crop rotation - replacing a susceptible crop with a less susceptible crop; and changing irrigation practices - less watering can reduce root disease and weeds.

Mechanical and physical controls kill a pest directly or make the environment unsuitable for it. For example, traps - for pest animals and insects; mulches - for weed management; steam sterilisation - for soil disease management; or barriers - such as screens or fences to keep animals and insects out.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development:

  • works with landholders and grower/community/biosecurity groups on control
  • provides diagnostic services and information on prevention, management and treatment
  • provides biosecurity measures to prevent introduction, and to eradicate or manage current pests

For advice on control methods search our website or contact our Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Articles

  • Control methods for ragwort (Senecio jacobaea) a declared pest in Western Australia.

  • Control methods for gamba grass (Andropogon gayanus), which is a declared pest in Western Australia.

  • Annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) is the main host for the seed-gall nematode Anguina funesta.

  • Integrated weed management (IWM) is a system for managing weeds over the long term, and is particularly useful for managing and minimising herbicide resistance.

  • Information is provided here to assist management of diseases and viruses that occur in broadacre crops grown in Western Australia - cereals (wheat, barley, oats and triticale), pulses (field pea,

  • Doublegee or spiny emex is a significant weed in Western Australia. It is a vigorous annual herb with a strong tap root and a long, fleshy, hairless stem.

  • In Western Australia, rising temperatures and falling water levels over summer encourage algae and aquatic weed growth in farm dams.

  • Landholders planning to grow broadacre, horticulture or tree crops or to preserve native vegetation need to control rabbits first. This article provides information about options for rabbit control

  • Galium tricornutum is a declared pest in Western Australia and subject of an eradication program. Report immediately the presence of this weed.

  • Leaf spot diseases affecting wheat in Western Australia are septoria nodorum blotch, yellow spot and septoria tritici blotch.