Livestock & animals

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development supply chain support, research and development and rigorous biosecurity systems underpin the economic success of Western Australia’s livestock industries. In 2011/12, the WA livestock industries contributed 26% of the state’s agriculture, fisheries and forestry production, worth approximately $2 billion at the farm gate.

WA is a world leader in live exports, super fine wool production and dryland sheep and grain systems. Both cattle and sheep systems are focused on export markets to Asia and the Middle East. WA also has innovative, world-class integrated dairy and pork industries meeting local and South East Asian demand for safe, fresh milk and pork. The WA poultry industry is growing strongly as a result of increasing domestic consumption.

Global demand for high-quality, safe animal protein and products produced according to high animal welfare standards will continue to rise in coming years. Increasingly DAFWA will partner with industry -- locally, nationally and internationally -- in transformational business projects to capitalise on this demand.

Articles

  • Red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is one of the most serious ant pests in the world and was found to be established in Brisbane, Queensland, in 2001.

  • Small hive beetle (Aethina tumidacan cause significant damage to bee hives.

  • Stable fly (Stomoxys calcitrans) is an international insect that has become an aggravating pest in Western Australia, particularly on the coastal plain, north and south of Perth.

  • Cattle lice cause irritation and rubbing that results in hair loss and poor coat quality. Cattle won’t always require treatment for a skin problem resulting from a lice infestation.

  • The bush fly is a native insect that has affected the lives of Western Australians since before European settlement.

  • The stickfast flea, first recorded in Western Australia (WA) at Geraldton in 1913, is now a common disease in backyard poultry flocks, especially during summer.