Beef cattle

The Western Australian beef herd consists of approximately two million head, half of which free range on extensive pastoral stations in the northern rangelands while the remainder roam the lush pastures of the agricultural region of the south and south-west of the state.

In 2011/12 the Australian Bureau of Statistics estimated the gross value of beef production in WA at $517 million. The state exported some 220 000 live cattle valued at $154 million in addition to 99 000 tonnes of boxed beef products worth $68 million in 2012.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development's current focus is on new and diversified market opportunities for WA live cattle exports and beef products. The department provides support to develop enduring supply chain relationships through effective communication, business model change and market development.

Articles

  • Identification of livestock is required by law under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management (Identification and Movement of Stock and Apiaries) Regulations 2013 [BAM (IMSA) Regulations].

  • Western Australia has a mandatory livestock ownership, identification and movement system.

  • All livestock in Western Australia must be correctly identified according to species.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) has commenced the extension of the State Barrier Fence eastwards from its current termination point near Ravensthorpe, extendin

  • Western Australia's State Barrier Fence plays an important role in preventing animal pests such as wild dogs from moving into the State's agricultural areas from pastoral areas in the east.

  • ‘Calf scours’ is when young calves develop diarrhoea and become dehydrated. The scour can be white, yellow, grey or blood-stained, and is often foul-smelling.

  • A key component of live animal exports is the health certification that demonstrates to the importing country that the livestock meet market requirements.

  • All livestock entering Western Australia are legally required to comply with the state's conditions of entry. Some stock are required undergo post-entry treatments, testing or inspections.

  • There are three strains of the bacteria, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, that cause Johne’s disease (JD): sheep/ovine (S-), cattle (C-/bovine) and bison strains.

  • Johne’s disease (JD) is an incurable infectious disease of ruminants including cattle, sheep, goats, alpaca and deer. It causes chronic diarrhoea and wasting, which eventually leads to death.

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