Management & reproduction

Reproductive rate varies widely among livestock species. Nonetheless, efficient reproduction is critical to profitability in all livestock industries. Nutrition and genetics are the key drivers of efficient reproduction. However, there are many other facets of management such as, behaviour, use of technology and housing that must also be taken into consideration if farm enterprises are to raise their reproductive rate.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development conducts research, development and extension activities in collaboration with industry partners to improve the productivity of the main livestock species. The objective is to support the economic development of the state by improving the profitability of Western Australian farm enterprises.

Articles

  • Feel like you’re dealing with your flock around the clock? Maybe it’s time to get yourself a better deal.

  • Wool and sheepmeat production systems rely on the breeding ewe — how she is managed sets up the efficiency and profitability of both the ewe and weaner flock.

  • Wool is called ‘tender’ when it is discounted for low staple strength. The point at which price discounts start depends on the market and the fibre diameter.

  • The health and nutrition of the pregnant ewe largely determines how successful lambing is in any given year.

  • The way the sheep enterprise is managed, including infrastructure and the pasture system, will influence the profitability of the enterprise and be reflected in the cost of production and the labou

  • Botulism is a rapid onset, usually fatal disease caused by the botulinum toxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum.

  • Western Australia's State Barrier Fence plays an important role in preventing animal pests such as wild dogs from moving into the State's agricultural areas from pastoral areas in the east.

  • The genetic potential of pigs can have a major influence on the productivity and profitability of a pig enterprise.

  • Pigs encounter humans in varying degrees on farm and at the abattoir. The consequence of pigs being handled negatively before slaughter is a reduction in pork quality.

  • There are a number of factors that may contribute to pigs having high backfat (P2) and therefore graded fatter than what is required by the market.

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