Management & reproduction

Reproductive rate varies widely among livestock species. Nonetheless, efficient reproduction is critical to profitability in all livestock industries. Nutrition and genetics are the key drivers of efficient reproduction. However, there are many other facets of management such as, behaviour, use of technology and housing that must also be taken into consideration if farm enterprises are to raise their reproductive rate.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development conducts research, development and extension activities in collaboration with industry partners to improve the productivity of the main livestock species. The objective is to support the economic development of the state by improving the profitability of Western Australian farm enterprises.

Articles

  • The Lambing Planner is a simple tool that allows you to change a lambing date or a joining date to see the impacts of that on other key times in the reproductive year.

  • These tools and calculators are designed to help producers manage their ewe flock more effectively and make better management decisions about feed budgeting and grazing.

  • Lambs should be marked between the ages of two to 12 weeks. Lambs should be tail docked using a gas-heated knife or rubber rings and mulesing should only be carried out when necessary.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development conducts a surveillance program for ewe abortion and newborn lamb deaths to assist sheep producers to identify the cause of abortions a

  • Pulpy kidney (enterotoxaemia) is a disease of sheep, goats and cattle.

  • Sheep farmers can save money and time eradicating new lice infestations by taking simple biosecurity measures that become part of normal management programs.

  • SheepMAP is a market assurance program designed to provide producers with a source of sheep which are at low risk of having ovine Johne's disease (OJD). The program is a voluntary scheme.

  • Pregnancy toxaemia and hypocalcaemia affect lambing ewe flocks and have similar signs but different causes.

  • Photosensitisation is inflammation of the skin, and occasionally the conjunctiva and cornea of the eye.

  • Arthritis means inflammation in one or more joints. In sheep, it is usually the result of bacterial infection.

Filter by search

Filter by topic