Management & reproduction

Reproductive rate varies widely among livestock species. Nonetheless, efficient reproduction is critical to profitability in all livestock industries. Nutrition and genetics are the key drivers of efficient reproduction. However, there are many other facets of management such as, behaviour, use of technology and housing that must also be taken into consideration if farm enterprises are to raise their reproductive rate.

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development conducts research, development and extension activities in collaboration with industry partners to improve the productivity of the main livestock species. The objective is to support the economic development of the state by improving the profitability of Western Australian farm enterprises.

Articles

  • The persistent nature of organochlorine (OC) residues in soils is an ongoing issue for livestock producers. Sheep are susceptible to the accumulation of OC residues.

  • This Sheep Industry Business Innovation (SIBI) subproject aimed to build industry capacity, both human and physical, to deliver the volume and quality of sheep and meat required by new markets.

  • Itch mites are small, barely visible parasites of sheep; they live on the skin surface and cause rubbing and fleece chewing in a small proportion of infested animals.

  • This pasture condition guide for the Kimberley rangelands in Western Australia describes the region's 17 most common pasture types – by soil group and dominant plants – with a description of pastor

  • Weaners are the most difficult class of sheep to manage effectively, largely because they usually cannot consume enough energy while grazing dry pastures and crop stubbles.

  • Monitoring the health and liveweight of weaners is important to ensure their survival and for producers to maximise profit.

  • Choosing the best time of lambing and matching paddock feed availability to ewe and weaner needs is important for both productivity and profitability.

  • The most common lice affecting sheep are body lice (Bovicola ovis).

  • The local lamb production system is seasonal and reflects the cost of finishing the lambs, with a large supply of lambs finished on green feed during spring.

  • Legislation regulating the poultry industry covers a wide array of issues ranging from disease control, food health and safety, the environment (odour and noise emissions), to agricultural chemical

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