Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • Harvesting crops on raised beds differs from harvesting on normal seedbeds only in terms of the constraints imposed by tracking the harvesting equipment in furrows if so desired.

  • The use of no-till crop establishment practice is essential for farming raised beds. Cultivation is likely to degrade the bed and furrow construction.

  • The costs of installing a system of raised beds should be recovered through a cropping program.

  • Integrated weed management (IWM) is a system for managing weeds over the long term, and is particularly useful for managing and minimising herbicide resistance.

  • Adult and nymph aphids suck sap with large populations limiting grain yield and size, especially winter and spring infestations.

  • The machinery needed to crop raised beds requires only one additional, specialised implement—a bedformer, which also converts to a bed-renovator.

  • Permanent raised beds are a practical and economic means of managing some waterlogged sites in wetter areas of the Western Australian grainbelt.

  • Raised beds are a long-term option for preventing waterlogging and increasing crop yield on target areas.

  • Waterlogging is a common problem in the agricultural soils of south-west Western Australia in the wetter months of winter.

  • Waterlogging in the higher rainfall areas (more than 450mm) of south-west Western Australian crops and pastures is a common cause of reduced plant growth in winter, especially on duplex soils.

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