Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • For bananas on the Ord River Irrigation Area, length of time to emergence and harvesting depend on air temperature, planting time and sucker management.

  • Higher banana plant densities are used in the Ord River Irrigation Area than other growing areas to modify canopy microclimates.

  • Tissue culture is the best method for propagating bananas. It ensures they are true to type and free from pests and diseases.

  • The Ord River Irrigation Area (ORIA) is suitable for growing bananas.

  • Many new navel and Valencia orange varieties have become available in recent years and are currently being evaluated under West Australian conditions.

  • Many new varieties of mandarins and tangors have become available in Western Australia with desirable traits for consumers such as few or no seeds and loose skin (easy peel).

  • MySoil is a simple tool to identify soil types. Growers can use soil identification to improve soil management and reduce the impact of soil constraints.

  • The aim of carbon farming is to sequester more carbon and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, as part of Australia's response to climate change.

  • Selecting the right rootstock for your orchard is one of the most important decisions you will have to make.

  • Soil organic carbon (SOC) is inherently low in Western Australian soils – limited by climate and soil type – with some potential to increase through management.

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