Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • Smaller paler plants with fewer tillers

    Nitrogen deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency in oats especially during cold, wet conditions and in well-drained soils in high rainfall areas.

     

  • Better growth in water gaining areas

    Spring drought refers to plant water stress from insufficient rainfall or stored soil moisture occurring between tillering to maturity. Oats show symptoms more readily than wheat and barley.

  • Young leaves turn pale green and wilted, then die back from the tip

    Most soils in Western Australia were copper deficient in their natural state.

  • Barley plant death from Fusilade® spray drift from neighbouring lupin paddock

    These are post-emergent grass contol herbicides used for annual ryegrass and/or wild oat control in wheat and barley or non-selective grass control in broadleaf crops.

  • Roots stunted, short and stubby with few laterals.

    A widespread fungal root disease that attacks seedlings but which rarely causes large yield losses.

     

  • GrainGuard is a coordinated and cooperative strategic approach between the grain industry and the Western Australian Government.

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