Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • Export hay fits into most of the accepted cropping rotatons and helps reduce weed seed banks, overcomes herbicide resistance and provides a break from traditional chemical regimes in addition to gi

  • The oat industry delivers nearly $200 million to the state economy each year through oats for human consumption and feed.

  • The oaten hay market in Western Australia has developed significantly in recent years.

  • Western Australia exports on average 48% of Australia's oaten hay, exporting around 300 000 tonnes worth over A$88 million in 2012/13.

  • Oats are more competitive with weeds than most other crops but weed control is still critical, particularly in hay crops as weeds can cause downgrading or rejection of export hay.

  • Growing oaten hay on frost-prone paddocks minimises the frost risk as it is cut soon after flowering, avoiding the frost-sensitive period.

  • There are specific requirements for hay for the export market that are different to usual on-farm requirements.

  • Oats in Western Australia are grown for grain, hay, grazing or silage. Each year between 250 000 and 350 000 hectares are sown for grain production, and 113 000 hectares for hay production.

  • Patches of pale stunted wilted plants

    Oats are very susceptible to manganese (Mn) deficiency, which produces a condition called 'grey speck'.

  • Oat plants showing symptoms of acute phosphorous deficiency including necosis moving down from old leaf tip

    Nearly all soils in Western Australia are phosphorus deficient in their natural state but the continual use of phosphorus fertiliser means acute deficiency in broadacre crops is rare, with the exce