Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • Windmill grass (Chloris truncata) is a native species and is the tenth most common summer weed species in the Western Australian wheatbelt.

  • Annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) is one of the most serious and costly weeds of annual winter cropping systems in southern Australia.

  • When selecting a wheat variety to implement in a farming system, it is important to be aware of the variety's disease package to plan management options. The disease resistance ratings for wheat va

  • Sclerotinia stem rot is a fungal disease of canola, that can cause significant yield losses exceeding 20% under conducive conditions.  Initially only common in parts of the Geraldton port zone, it

  • Blackleg is the most regularly occurring, serious disease of canola in Western Australia.

  • In 2022, the department is conducting more than 300 research trials across the state from Kununurra in the north to Esperance in the south.

  • Which foliar fungicide active ingredients are registered for which cereal diseases in WA?

  • The information provided on this page details products with full registration or with permits for use in pulse crops and provides further details on application rates, withholding periods and other

  • No treatment in this trial effectively repelled small conical snails.

    No treatment caused significant mortality of conical snails over 21 days when compared to the nil treatment.

  • With lupins being susceptible and grown in close rotation to canola, particularly in the northern WA wheatbelt, lupin growers are facing increasing pressure from sclerotinia stem rot (caused by

Pages

Filter by search

Filter by topic