Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) and The University of Western Australia (UWA) are leading research into breeding flavonoid-rich apples – healthier apples for c

  • The Pome and Summer Fruit Orchard Spray Guide 2020-21 provides information on chemical products, both registered and those as minor use permits, to control insect, mite and mollusc pests, diseases

  • Drip irrigation is common in modern orchards. For this method of irrigation it is easier to use litres rather than the more traditional unit of millimetres when describing readily available water i

  • Garden weevil (Phlyctinus callosus) was accidentally introduced into Western Australia from South Africa. This weevil is now a severe pest of grapevines and other horticultural crops.

  • The European earwig (Forficula auricularia) is native to Europe and has been in Australia from the mid-1850s.

  • Carpophilus, also known as driedfruit beetles, are a worldwide pest of fruits, both pre- and post-harvest, and grains.

  • Apple looper (Phrissogonus laticostata) is a native insect that damages fruit in apple orchards and vineyards in the South West of Western Australia.

  • European red mite feeds on leaves of fruit trees especially apples. This can result in premature leaf fall which affects fruit tree vigour and fruit quality.

  • Mites are one of the most consistent pests in deciduous fruit tree orchards in Western Australia. Over-reliance on miticides for control has led to pesticide resistance in some species.

  • Findings from the first year of an apple netting demonstration in Manjimup show that growing apples in a netted enclosure resulted in saving irrigation water.

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