Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • Selecting the right rootstock for your orchard is one of the most important decisions you will have to make.

  • Many new navel and Valencia orange varieties have become available in recent years and are currently being evaluated under West Australian conditions.

  • Many new varieties of mandarins and tangors have become available in Western Australia with desirable traits for consumers such as few or no seeds and loose skin (easy peel).

  • Pruning is a cultural practice involving the removal of tree branches and limbs.

  • Western Australia has a low prevalence of citrus pests and diseases compared to most other countries.

  • Drip irrigation is common in modern orchards. For this method of irrigation it is easier to use litres rather than the more traditional unit of millimetres when describing readily available water i

  • Mealybugs (family Pseudococcidae) are oval-shaped, segmented, soft-bodied insects covered with white, mealy wax. They are often found between touching fruit, under the calyx or in the 'navels' of o

  • Thrips (Thysanoptera) are small, slender, soft-bodied insects, just visible to the naked eye.

  • Find out more about the most common insect pests of citrus trees occurring in home gardens in Western Australia and their control using natural or low toxic chemical controls.

  • Citrus leafminer, Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton, is the only leafminer attacking citrus in Australia.

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