Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • At head emergence, each grain is replaced by brown to black powdery spores

    Loose smut (Ustilago avenae) and covered smut (Ustilago hordei) of oats are both externally seed- borne diseases with similar symptoms which are difficult to distinguish in the fi

  • Major leaf diseases of oats are stem rust, leaf rust, barley yellow dwarf virus and septoria avenae blotch; their severity changes with seasons.

  • Affected plants stunted with stiff, rolled leaves, which are sometimes darker than those of healthy plants.

    A widespread root disease caused by a soil-borne fungus and generating yield losses of 1-5% in Western Australia each year.

  • Nematodes can feed on root tissues of a wide range of plant species and lead to root damage which can result in significant crop yield loss.

  • Determining the relative yield loss (tolerance) of commonly grown and newly released oat varieties to crown rot pathogens Fusarium pseudograminearum and F. culmorum.

  • Oat leaves displaying water soaked appearance with red-brown longitudinal stripes typical of stripe blight

    There are two types of bacterial disease which infect oat foliage; halo (Pseudomonas syringae pv. coronafaciens) and stripe (Pseudomonas syringae pv. striafaciens) blight.

  • Straw or brown colour spots surrounded by a yellow water-soaked halo than may resemble septoria

    There are two types of bacterial disease which infect oat foliage; halo blight (Pseudomonas syringae pv. coronafaciens) and stripe blight (Pseudomonas syringae pv.

  • Roots stunted, short and stubby with few laterals.

    A widespread fungal root disease that attacks seedlings but which rarely causes large yield losses.