Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • White pinprick spot form

    Physiological leaf spotting occurs in many forms that may be easily mistaken for spotting symptoms caused by pathogens or herbicides. It is not thought to affect yield.

  • Nematodes can feed on root tissues of a wide range of plant species and lead to root damage which can result in significant crop yield loss.

  • In severe cases whole plants develop white heads after flowering.

    A fungal disease most common in continuous cereal crops, which affects roots and lower stems and is usually not detected until after heading.

  • First signs are dark spots with yellow edges

    Spot-type net blotch is a stubble-borne fungal foliar disease occurring more frequently in the medium and high rainfall areas of the West Australian (WA) wheatbelt.

  • Large elongated mid-brown blotches surrounded by a margin of chlorotic tissue

    A fungal foliar disease caused by Pyrenophora wirreganensis that primarily infects a range of grasses and can be found on paddock and road verges in spring.

  • Roots of affected plants are blackened and brittle and break easily, and are black to the core not just on outer surface.

    A fungal root disease that can cause severe yield losses of wheat and barley especially in medium- to high-rainfall areas.

     

  • Grains are replaced by brown-black balls

    A fungal disease affecting seed heads, which can cause yield losses and delivery penalties.

     

  • Light brown pustule on upper leaf surface that darken with age

    A fungal leaf disease specific to barley that can spread rapidly within and between crops causing yield losses of up to 45% in susceptible varieties.

     

  • Florets are replaced with a mass of dark brown-black powdery spores that blow away.

    A fungal disease affecting seed heads, which can cause yield losses and delivery penalties.

     

  • Dark brown spots that elongate and produce dark brown net-type streaks

    Net-type net blotch is a stubble-borne fungal foliar disease occurring more frequently in the medium and high rainfall areas of the WA wheatbelt. It can reduce grain yield and quality.