Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • Carrot leaf blight is a disease commonly found in carrot crops in Western Australia. It is usually caused by the fungus Alternaria dauci and occasionally by A. radicina.

  • Carrot virus Y has been found in carrot crops throughout Australia.

  • Waxflower is susceptible to a range of foliar diseases. The main problems which occur in commercial plantations and their control are outlined here.

  • The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia has initiated a policy review for Panama disease associated with host material and linked packaging imported from other Australian states a

  • Little cherry disease [Ampelovirus Little cherry virus 2 (LChV-2)] is a serious pest of cherries that can affect fruit development and quality.

  • The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia has initiated a policy review of the importation of washed ware potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) from other Australian states and terr

  • Turnip mosaic virus, cauliflower mosaic virus and beet western yellows virus occasionally cause significant economic loss in vegetable brassica crops such as cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, Chinese

  • Powdery mildew is a disease which is becoming more prevalent in Western Australian strawberry crops as increasing areas are being grown under high (Haygrove) tunnels.

  • Strawberries are affected by a number of pathogens causing crown and/or root rots.  These diseases are becoming more prevalent for several reasons including the withdrawal of methyl bromide as a so

  • Phytophthora root rot is the most common soil-borne disease causing plant death in native cutflower production.

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