Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • Psa (Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae) is a disease of kiwifruit that can spread rapidly through kiwifruit orchards and kill many vines.

  • Information is provided here to assist management of diseases and viruses that occur in broadacre crops grown in Western Australia - cereals (wheat, barley, oats and triticale), pulses (field pea,

  • Bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum) is a serious disease of potatoes that can cause crop losses of more than 90%.

  • Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum is an exotic pest to Australia. It can affect both solanaceous and apiaceous crops.

  • Broccoli, cabbage, Chinese cabbage, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts are members of the brassica family.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development has taken action to protect Western Australia’s citrus growers from the threat of citrus canker following confirmation that the disease

  • Dickeya dianthicola is a serious bacterium that can cause tuber soft rot and blackleg in potatoes, and can also affect some ornamental varieties, chicory and artichoke.

  • Soft rot can cause heavy losses in stored potatoes if not properly managed, creating a perception of poor quality in export seed potato markets.

  • Straw or brown colour spots surrounded by a yellow water-soaked halo than may resemble septoria

    There are two types of bacterial disease which infect oat foliage; halo blight (Pseudomonas syringae pv. coronafaciens) and stripe blight (Pseudomonas syringae pv.

  • Leaf spots that turn yellowish and later brown and papery

    Bacterial Blight (Pseudomonas syringae pv.pisi) is rarely seen in Western Australia.

Filter by search

Filter by topic