Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • Biochar is a stable, carbon-rich form of charcoal that can be added to soil to sequester carbon and reduce net greenhouse gas emissions.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development assessed the potential and reported wheat yield of the 18 million hectares of agricultural land in the south-west of Western Australia

  • Acid soils cause significant losses in production and biomass, which restricts the ability to sequester carbon.

  • Spreading clay on light, sandy soils helps to increase soil water holding capacity, retain nutrients and overcome water repellence.

  • The potential yield tool uses seasonal rainfall and decile finishes, calculated from historical data, to calculate the maximum wheat yield possible in the absence of any other constraints.

  • Plant available soil water graphs show the amount of soil water accumulated from the start of summer (1 November) through the grain growing season and can be used as a tool in the seasonal decision

  • FlowerPower is an online tool to predict cereal flowering dates (or cutting dates for oats) in your location.

  • Western Australian agriculture experiences variability in its winter growing season (May–October): late starts, early finishes and 'dry seasons' with rainfall low enough to cause serious plant and

  • Climate change is putting pressure on wheat yields in the south-west of Western Australia in several ways: lower annual and autumn and spring rainfall; later starts to the growing season; higher te

  • Cockchafers belonging to the genus Heteronyx are typically not regarded as a pest of agriculture. However, two have been seen as occasional pests, with H.

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