Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • Permanent raised beds are a practical and economic means of managing some waterlogged sites in wetter areas of the Western Australian grainbelt.

  • To make sound decisions on managing saline sites, you need to know the source of salt, how salinisation is occurring, the landscape context, and most importantly, the actual salt concentration of t

  • Poor weed and pea germination due to wet saline soil

    Field peas are sensitive to waterlogging and moderately sensitive to soil salinity. Soil salinity affects plant growth by reducing the roots ability to extract water from the soil.

  • Reduced emergence and smaller plants that die earlier near saline areas

    Salinity affects plant growth by reducing the root's ability to extract water from the soil. Salinity damage varies from season to season due to variations in the soil salt concentration.

  • Wheatbelt valley secondary salinity

    Salinity affects growth by reducing plant root ability to extract water from the soil, and chloride toxicity.