Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • Western Australian agriculture experiences variability in its winter growing season (May–October): late starts, early finishes and 'dry seasons' with rainfall low enough to cause serious plant and

  • A new guide has been published to assist canola and pulse growers to identify frost damage and consider crop management decisions. Frost damage reduces crop yield and grain quality.

  • In September 2017, six department research officers presented at the biennial Australian Agronomy Conference in Ballarat, Victoria.

  • Young pods abort or are poorly filled

    Canola is most susceptible to frost damage from flowering to the clear watery stage (approximately 60% moisture). Plants frequently recover from frost at early flowering by producing more flowers.

  • Through targeted grains research and development (R&D), the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development's (DPIRD) Boosting Grains Research and Development project aims to increase

  • Scattered germination due to insufficient soil moisture

    Early drought may affect germination and early growth. Water stressed seedlings are more severely affected by other constraints and may have induced nutrient deficiencies.