Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • Information is provided here to assist management of diseases and viruses that occur in broadacre crops grown in Western Australia - cereals (wheat, barley, oats and triticale), pulses (field pea,

  • Stunted plant with thickened leaves and reddened margins

    Beet western yellows virus (BWYV) that has been renamed Turnip Yellows virus (TuYV) is an aphid-borne virus that causes yield and quality losses in canola.  It also infects other crop and pasture s

  • Turnip yellows virus (TuYV; formerly beet western yellows virus) is an aphid-borne virus that causes yield and quality losses in canola.

  • Turnip mosaic virus, cauliflower mosaic virus and beet western yellows virus occasionally cause significant economic loss in vegetable brassica crops such as cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, Chinese

  • Varietal symptoms vary but leaf mottling and puckering is common

    An aphid-borne viral disease in canola that has the potential to cause significant yield loss with early infection, but is uncommon.

     

  • Wrinkled leaves and characteristic ringspots

    An aphid borne viral disease in canola that has the potential to cause significant yield loss with early infection, but rarely occurs in WA.