Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • Since 1998 the Department of Agriculture and Food in conjunction with the Western Australian Vine Improvement Association has imported more than 60 new varieties and clones of wine grape material.

  • PBA Jurien is a high yielding Australian sweet lupin variety suitable for all lupin growing areas of Australia and it provides a significant yield improvement over current varieties in most of thes

  • WAVIA is an industry-based organisation that works to facilitate the access, production and distribution of improved planting material to the viticulture industry of Western Australia.

  • Pollination is one of the keys to profitable apple production. As a general rule, apple varieties are not self-fertile and will not set a full crop without a compatible polliniser.

  • Mango fruit produced in the Perth area is seasonally the latest in Australia and receives high prices in WA and interstate.

  • Recent research from the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia's barley agronomy team has busted the myth that increasing the seed rate of barley will significantly decrease the qua

  • While Hass avocados are commonly grown in the South-West of Western Australia without a cross-polliniser variety, much interest has focused around the potential benefits of using a suitable cross-p

  • Jarrahdale, Japanese and butternut pumpkins are grown in Kununurra, Carnarvon and the south-west of Western Australia to supply the local market and eastern Australia.

  • Two types of fresh beans are grown in Western Australia — climbing or runner beans, and dwarf or French beans.

  • A blue colouring in the aleurone layer of barley grain (the layer immediately below the husk) may be present in some varieties.

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