Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • Flower Power is an online tool to predict wheat flowering times of up to three different varieties at the same time and the risk of frost or heat stress in your location.

  • Poor, dry seasons can cause crops (cereals, lupins and canola) to be patchy and short.

  • Selecting the right rootstock for your orchard is one of the most important decisions you will have to make.

  • Many new navel and Valencia orange varieties have become available in recent years and are currently being evaluated under West Australian conditions.

  • Many new varieties of mandarins and tangors have become available in Western Australia with desirable traits for consumers such as few or no seeds and loose skin (easy peel).

  • The fall armyworm moth (Spodoptera frugiperda) is a plant pest that can damage a wide variety of crops.

  • 'Regional Research Agronomy' is the abbreviated working title for the 'Building crop protection and crop production agronomy research and development capacity in regional Western Australia' project

  • The Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS) provides advisory and identification services on animal and plant pests, weeds and diseases that impact Western Australia's agriculture and food ind

  • The aim of carbon farming is to sequester more carbon and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, as part of Australia's response to climate change.

  • Soil organic matter influences nutrient supply and water-holding capacity in soil.

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