Crops

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development continues to support the growth and international competitiveness of all crop industries in Western Australia.

With a 2400 kilometre span from its tropical north to its temperate south, WA supports a broad range of cropping industries from rain-fed winter cereals through to irrigated horticultural crops.

In the 2012/13 year the WA cropping industries exported a total of $3.9 billion which comprised: $3.1 billion of cereals, $859 million of pulses, pastures and oilseeds, $142 million of horticultural crops. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), canola ($756 million), barley ($377 million), lupins ($42 million), carrots at $48 million, oats ($12 million), and strawberries at $5.5 million.

Articles

  • DDLS Seed Testing and Certification offers a wide range of tests to assess the quality of your seed.

  • Purchase of a sealed silo is an important investment for better grain insect control.

  • The Western Australian grain industry is a major contributor to the agrifood sector and the Australian economy.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) is supporting the Western Australian grains industry and businesses to boost profitability, export competitiveness and sustaina

  • Wheat is the major grain crop produced in Western Australia making up 65% of annual grain production and generating A$2-3 billion for the State economy each year.

  • DDLS Seed Testing and Certification is a leading service provider in the field of seed certification.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development Diagnostic Laboratory Services (DDLS) - Seed Testing and Certification provides a variety of services including seed testing, crop and

  • Lupins are uniquely suited to the acid and sandy soils found across large tracts of the Western Australian wheatbelt and play an important role in breaking cereal disease cycles and adding fixed ni

  • The oat industry delivers nearly $200 million to the state economy each year through oats for human consumption and feed.

  • Maintaining the quality of grain that has been grown is all about the correct and timely harvesting of the grain and its management and storage once removed from the paddock.