Citrus

The Western Australian citrus industry primarily supplies the local market with high quality oranges, mandarins, grapefruit, lemons and limes. 

Growing areas range from Kununurra in the north to Harvey in the south with recent expansion and large businesses near Moora. The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia works very closely with the WA Citrus Improvement Group and Fruit West on trialling new varieties and providing other technical assistance.

Fresh citrus is available for much of the year from local orchards and imported at other times. The main local season runs from May to December. 

Articles

  • Find out more about the most common insect pests of citrus trees occurring in home gardens in Western Australia and their control using natural or low toxic chemical controls.

  • Six-spotted mite can defoliate avocado trees and grapevines in the lower south-west of Western Australia.

  • Snails cause damage to citrus orchards by feeding on fruit and leaves. Snail management is a multi-step process that involves both cultural and chemical control.

  • Western Australia has a low prevalence of citrus pests and diseases compared to most other countries.

  • Four species of aphids on citrus are recorded in Australia but only two occur in Western Australia, the brown/black citrus aphid Toxoptera citricidus (Kirkaldy) and spiraea aphid, Aphi

  • Citrus leafminer, Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton, is the only leafminer attacking citrus in Australia.

  • Carpophilus, also known as driedfruit beetles, are a worldwide pest of fruits, both pre- and post-harvest, and grains.

  • Thrips (Thysanoptera) are small, slender, soft-bodied insects, just visible to the naked eye.

  • Citrus gall wasp is a pest of citrus trees grown in backyards and orchards. Citrus tree owners are encouraged to implement control measures on their property to reduce the threat to the citrus indu

  • Mealybugs (family Pseudococcidae) are oval-shaped, segmented, soft-bodied insects covered with white, mealy wax. They are often found between touching fruit, under the calyx or in the 'navels' of o