Grains

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development has significant direct investment in grains research, development and extension capability and activities, research infrastructure and policy development.

The Western Australian grains industry is a major contributor to the agrifood sector and the Australian economy. WA produces on average 13 million tonnes of grains (cereals, oilseeds and pulses) each year. Grain exports generate more than $4 billion (five year average) for the WA economy each year – making it the largest agricultural sector in the state, and the fourth largest export industry overall after iron ore, oil and gas, and gold.

WA exports about 80% of its annual grain production to more than 50 countries worldwide. Indonesia is WA’s top wheat export market worth over $0.5 billion per year. WA is the world’s leading supplier of premium malting barley to China, the major supplier of wheat for the Japanese udon noodle market, and a major feed barley supplier to the Middle East.

In the 2014/15 season it is estimated the WA grains industry exported a total of $3.7 billion of cereals and $790 billion of pulse, pasture and oilseeds. The major contributors to these exports were wheat ($2.7 billion), barley ($905 million), canola ($710 million), oats ($83 million) and lupins ($77 million).

Articles

  • Scattered germination due to insufficient soil moisture

    Early drought may affect germination and early growth. Water stressed seedlings are more severely affected by other constraints and may have induced nutrient deficiencies.

  • Flattened strap-like flowering stem

    Fasciation is a relatively rare condition of abnormal growth in the growing point that has no economic significance in canola.

  • Uniformly affected plants with pale leaf blotches

    Group F herbicides are registered for selective control of wild radish, wild mustard and wild turnip in cereals, legume crops and legume pastures. Canola is less affected than brassica weeds

  • Summer crops can be grown for various reasons including replacing a ‘missed’ cereal crop, control herbicide resistant weeds, filling a summer feed gap for livestock or for watertable control.

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