Oats

The Western Australian oat industry generates about $200 million for the state economy each year through the production of milled (rolled) oats for human consumption and feed oats and oaten hay for livestock production.

The major markets for Australian milling oats are Mexico, North Asia, South-East Asia and South Africa.

Western Australian feed oats are well received by international markets, particularly the growing Middle Eastern and Japanese race horse industries.

WA produces about 50% of Australia's export hay – most of which is sent to the Japanese dairy industry. 

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development is a partner within the National Oat Breeding Program, which is responsible for breeding and developing new oat grain and hay varieties with superior quality. 

Articles

  • Determining the relative yield loss (tolerance) of commonly grown and newly released oat varieties to crown rot pathogens Fusarium pseudograminearum and F. culmorum.

  • Oat leaves showing brown blotches with surrounding yellow areas typical of septoria blotch

    Septoria avenae blotch is the most common oat disease in Western Australia. It occurs throughout the cereal growing areas, and is most severe in the high rainfall areas.

  • Oat leaves displaying water soaked appearance with red-brown longitudinal stripes typical of stripe blight

    There are two types of bacterial disease which infect oat foliage; halo (Pseudomonas syringae pv. coronafaciens) and stripe (Pseudomonas syringae pv. striafaciens) blight.

  • Patches of pale stunted wilted plants

    Oats are very susceptible to manganese (Mn) deficiency, which produces a condition called 'grey speck'.

  • Oat plants showing symptoms of acute phosphorous deficiency including necosis moving down from old leaf tip

    Nearly all soils in Western Australia are phosphorus deficient in their natural state but the continual use of phosphorus fertiliser means acute deficiency in broadacre crops is rare, with the exce

  • Straw or brown colour spots surrounded by a yellow water-soaked halo than may resemble septoria

    There are two types of bacterial disease which infect oat foliage; halo blight (Pseudomonas syringae pv. coronafaciens) and stripe blight (Pseudomonas syringae pv.

  • CSBP oat nutrition trial showing oat crop with symptoms of potassium deficiency

    Potassium is required for photosynthesis, transport of sugars, enzyme activation and controlling water balance within plant cells.

  • Withered and split leaf tips

    Heat stress is caused by high temperatures and hot dry winds before or during flowering.

  • Smaller paler plants with fewer tillers

    Nitrogen deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency in oats especially during cold, wet conditions and in well-drained soils in high rainfall areas.

     

  • Better growth in water gaining areas

    Spring drought refers to plant water stress from insufficient rainfall or stored soil moisture occurring between tillering to maturity. Oats show symptoms more readily than wheat and barley.

Filter by search

Filter by topic