Oats

The Western Australian oat industry generates about $200 million for the state economy each year through the production of milled (rolled) oats for human consumption and feed oats and oaten hay for livestock production.

The major markets for Australian milling oats are Mexico, North Asia, South-East Asia and South Africa.

Western Australian feed oats are well received by international markets, particularly the growing Middle Eastern and Japanese race horse industries.

WA produces about 50% of Australia's export hay – most of which is sent to the Japanese dairy industry. 

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development is a partner within the National Oat Breeding Program, which is responsible for breeding and developing new oat grain and hay varieties with superior quality. 

Articles

  • Oats are more competitive with weeds than most other crops but weed control is still critical, particularly in hay crops as weeds can cause downgrading or rejection of export hay.

  • Oats in Western Australia are grown for grain, hay, grazing or silage. Each year between 250 000 and 350 000 hectares are sown for grain production, and 113 000 hectares for hay production.

  • Straw or brown colour spots surrounded by a yellow water-soaked halo than may resemble septoria

    There are two types of bacterial disease which infect oat foliage; halo blight (Pseudomonas syringae pv. coronafaciens) and stripe blight (Pseudomonas syringae pv.