Lupins

Western Australia is the world’s largest producer and exporter of lupins with the majority exported as animal feed to the European Union, Japan and Korea – delivering the state about $65 million in export earnings in 2011–12.

Lupins are now being promoted as human food with medical studies confirming their benefits in combating high blood sugar, heart disease and obesity.

Since the release of the first fully domesticated Australian sweet lupin in the late 1960s, lupin breeding by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development has resulted in a doubling of lupin yields from 0.7-1.5 tonnes per hectare.

The department supports the pre-breeding, breeding, agronomics and market development of the WA lupins industry, in conjunction with industry partners.

Articles

  • GrainGuard is a coordinated and cooperative strategic approach between the grain industry and the Western Australian Government.

  • Amira is a relatively early flowering variety that produces high yields in similar areas to where Kiev Mutant was popular before the outbreak of anthracnose.

  • Narrow leafed lupins are a grain legume crop for the deep sandy acidic soils of Western Australia. Growing a successful lupin crop is not technically difficult.

  • The Western Australian grain industry is a major contributor to the agrifood sector and the Australian economy.

  • Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is a seed- and aphid-borne virus that infects narrow-leafed lupins. It can also infect many other broad-leafed plant species.

  • Details of current genetically modified (GM) crop trials and post harvest monitoring (PHM) sites in Australia can be found on the Office of the Gene Technology Regulator (OGTR) web page.

  • Lupins are uniquely suited to the acid and sandy soils found across large tracts of the Western Australian wheatbelt and play an important role in breaking cereal disease cycles and adding fixed ni

  • Cockchafers belonging to the genus Heteronyx are typically not regarded as a pest of agriculture. However, two have been seen as occasional pests, with H.

  • Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) causes a serious disease in narrow-leafed lupins. BYMV is found predominantly in high rainfall wheatbelt zones but occurs less often in medium rainfall zones.

  • Andromeda is a variety of albus lupin with considerably better tolerance to the disease anthracnose (Colletotrichum lupini) than Kiev Mutant.

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