Climate, land & water

Western Australia’s agriculture sector needs access to productive soil and water resources for growth and profit. However, the sector must compete with increasing resource demands from all sectors of the community, and the pressures of a changing climate. The Agriculture and Food division of the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development supports agriculture by providing long-term management solutions, practical risk management strategies and tools to maintain and improve resource conditions, to meet the needs of industry and stakeholders. Agriculture and Food is also pioneering soil and water investigation of the state’s undeveloped areas to establish new irrigated agricultural industries.

Articles

  • Saline lands in Western Australia (WA) often suffer winter waterlogging, with the levels of salinity and depth to watertable varying markedly both spatially and between seasons.

  • The Departmentof Primary Industries and Regional Development provides up-to-date information about the coming season and its potential impacts on cropping and agriculture.

  • Water quality can influence the efficacy of chemicals used in spraying crops and pastures.

  • Buffel and birdwood grasses (Cenchrus ciliaris and C. setiger) are introduced species found in the Western Australian rangelands.

  • Most unplanned fires have a drastic effect on a pasture. Fire changes the plant composition and reduces growth and carrying capacity in the following season.

  • We provide this information on buffel grass pastures in the Kimberley to be used as a reference for assessing pasture condition, and as a guide for pastoral station staff and others interested in t

  • Estimating or measuring soil texture provides valuable information about soil properties affecting crop and pasture growth. Soil texture affects the movement and availability of air, nutrients and

  • Three-quarters of high rainfall (more than 600mm annual rainfall) clover pastures in Western Australia do not need additional phosphorus for optimal plant growth.

  • Whole farm nutrient mapping helps graziers make informed nutrient management decisions.

  • Feed intake and methane emissions are influenced by the digestibility of the pasture and the concentration of plant secondary compounds such as tannins.

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