Climate, land & water

Western Australia’s agriculture sector needs access to productive soil and water resources for growth and profit. However, the sector must compete with increasing resource demands from all sectors of the community, and the pressures of a changing climate. The Agriculture and Food division of the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development supports agriculture by providing long-term management solutions, practical risk management strategies and tools to maintain and improve resource conditions, to meet the needs of industry and stakeholders. Agriculture and Food is also pioneering soil and water investigation of the state’s undeveloped areas to establish new irrigated agricultural industries.

Articles

  • A new guide has been published to assist cereal growers to identify frost damage and consider crop management decisions.

  • As part of the successful Getting Value from Farm Data Networks grower group forum at Technology Park, Bentley, four high quality speakers presented to about 70 attendees.

  • The aim of the eConnected Grainbelt Project is to make a real difference to growers’ businesses and the grains industry.

  • This page provides a summary of the seasonal conditions and outlook for the rest of the season, and management options for dealing with any problems arising from those conditions.

  • This page hosts the 2018 frost trial information, handy project resources and the frost severity maps (from August).

  • Most unplanned fires have a drastic effect on a pasture. Fire changes the plant composition and reduces growth and carrying capacity in the following season.

  • Managing farm biosecurity following a fire, flood or dry season is a balance of caring for livestock and paddocks while limiting the introduction of new pests, diseases or weeds onto the property.

  • Sheep are common victims of fires in Australia. The information below describes how fire may affect sheep and the management options landholders have.

  • Cattle are common victims of fires in Australia. Cattle are generally less affected by fires than sheep because of their superior height and speed, but they can be severely burnt if trapped, such a

  • After a fire, agisting livestock away from affected properties may be an option.

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