Climate, land & water

Western Australia’s agriculture sector needs access to productive soil and water resources for growth and profit. However, the sector must compete with increasing resource demands from all sectors of the community, and the pressures of a changing climate. The Agriculture and Food division of the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development supports agriculture by providing long-term management solutions, practical risk management strategies and tools to maintain and improve resource conditions, to meet the needs of industry and stakeholders. Agriculture and Food is also pioneering soil and water investigation of the state’s undeveloped areas to establish new irrigated agricultural industries.

Articles

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development assessed groundwater and land potential for irrigated agriculture expansion in the Midlands region of Western Australia, with informati

  • Fire is integral to many ecosystems in the Western Australian rangelands.

  • Permanent raised beds are a practical and economic means of managing some waterlogged sites in wetter areas of the Western Australian grainbelt.

  • This page summarises the preliminary soil and groundwater resource assessment findings for the Mantinea Development area, part of the Goomig farmlands in the Ord River Irrigation Expansion Stage 2,

  • Climate projections for Western Australia (WA) are that average annual temperature will increase by 1.1–2.7°C in a medium-emission scenario, and 2.6–5.1°C in a high-emission scenario by the end of

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development provides up-to-date information about the coming season and its potential impacts on cropping and agriculture.

  • All agricultural industries in Western Australia will need to deal with some level of climate change in the coming decades. The effects of climate change will vary regionally and by enterprise, wit

  • Wind erosion in Western Australian agriculture is common, especially in years of late and dry growing seasons.

  • Flooding in the Gascoyne River Catchment during the summer of 2010–11 caused the loss of an estimated 9 million tonnes of soil from erosion, and a damage bill of about $90 million.

  • Permanent raised beds are a practical and economic means of managing some waterlogged sites in wetter areas of the Western Australian grainbelt.

Filter by search

Filter by topic