Climate, land & water

Western Australia’s agriculture sector needs access to productive soil and water resources for growth and profit. However, the sector must compete with increasing resource demands from all sectors of the community, and the pressures of a changing climate. The Agriculture and Food division of the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development supports agriculture by providing long-term management solutions, practical risk management strategies and tools to maintain and improve resource conditions, to meet the needs of industry and stakeholders. Agriculture and Food is also pioneering soil and water investigation of the state’s undeveloped areas to establish new irrigated agricultural industries.

Articles

  • Tropical agriculture on the Ord River in Western Australia's Kimberley region began in 1941.

  • The Gascoyne Food Bowl Initiative (GFBI) was established in 2012 to increase horticultural production in the area, matched with borefield development.

  • Climate change will affect horticultural production in Western Australia (WA) in a number of ways, and the effects will depend on location, soil type, crop type and management.

  • Jujubes (or Chinese dates) are a new horticultural industry in Western Australia. This page outlines recommendations for irrigating jujubes in WA.

  • This page summarises the preliminary soil and groundwater resource assessment findings for the Mantinea Development area, part of the Goomig farmlands in the Ord River Irrigation Expansion Stage 2,

  • All agricultural industries in Western Australia will need to deal with some level of climate change in the coming decades. The effects of climate change will vary regionally and by enterprise, wit

  • Irrigation design and management affects performance, yield and quality of crops.  Irrigation design determines the efficiency and effectiveness of water use, and therefore influences the profitabi

  • This page and attached reports are part of the assessments for expansion of Ord River Irrigation in Western Australia’s Kimberley region: the 6000 hectares of red loamy soils – the Cockatoo Sands –

  • Estimating or measuring soil texture provides valuable information about soil properties affecting crop and pasture growth. Soil texture affects the movement and availability of air, nutrients and

  • Nearly all biofuel systems (mainly biodiesel and bioethanol) produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions than fossil fuels (diesel and petrol derived from fossil oil).

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