Climate, land & water

Western Australia’s agriculture sector needs access to productive soil and water resources for growth and profit. However, the sector must compete with increasing resource demands from all sectors of the community, and the pressures of a changing climate. The Agriculture and Food division of the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development supports agriculture by providing long-term management solutions, practical risk management strategies and tools to maintain and improve resource conditions, to meet the needs of industry and stakeholders. Agriculture and Food is also pioneering soil and water investigation of the state’s undeveloped areas to establish new irrigated agricultural industries.

Articles

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) is planning for the future of irrigated agriculture development in the Pilbara

  • Waterlogging is a common problem in the agricultural soils of south-west Western Australia in the wetter months of winter.

  • Waterlogging in the higher rainfall areas (more than 450mm) of south-west Western Australian crops and pastures is a common cause of reduced plant growth in winter, especially on duplex soils.

  • Waterlogging in some years and some environments in the high rainfall areas of south-west Western Australia can cause significant reductions in plant growth.

  • This page contains information about managing nutrition in canola crops in Western Australia.

  • Saline lands in Western Australia (WA) often suffer winter waterlogging, with the levels of salinity and depth to watertable varying markedly both spatially and between seasons.

  • To make sound decisions on managing saline sites, you need to know the source of salt, how salinisation is occurring, the landscape context, and most importantly, the actual salt concentration of t

  • This page summarises a review of a new direction for salinity management in Western Australia (December 2018), in response to an audit of salinity management by the Office of the Auditor General in

  • Extensive wind erosion of field pea stubble often follows grazing over summer and autumn. Semi-leafless field pea varieties have reduced lodging, improved pod-height and reduced pod-shatter.

  • Shallow relief drains are effective at removing surface water from flooded land. Removing flood water reduces waterlogging and groundwater recharge and improves productivity of the soil.

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