Soil salinity

Dryland salinity is a major form of land degradation. More than one million hectares of broadacre farmland in Western Australia is estimated to be currently affected by dryland salinity. The department can provide the technical information needed to assist landholders and the community to diagnose the extent and effect of salinity along with mitigation strategies. Through activities such as groundwater and soil analysis, landholders can confidently assess salinity risks and implement appropriate management responses.

Articles

  • Reforestation, afforestation and revegetation can sequester significant amounts of carbon per hectare.

  • Land managers can use groundwater pumping to lower local watertables and reduce the spread of local salinity.

  • Leveed deep drains are deep excavated channels with sloping floors and sides and levees on both sides.

  • Disposal of saline effluent (brine) from desalination is covered by regulations requiring owners or occupiers to notify the Commissioner of Soil and Land Conservation before any discharge takes pla

  • Open deep drains are deep excavated channels with sloping floors and sides, designed to intercept and drain surface (usually fresh) and subsurface water (usually saline in Western Australia) from a

  • Members of the public can lodge a complaint about observed land management with the Commissioner of Soil and Land Conservation in Western Australia, and the Commissioner will then investigate the c

  • This page lists species commonly found on or near saline land in southern Western Australia. These species can be used as indicators of the level of salinity and waterlogging on the site.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) carries out the requirements of the Soil and Land Conservation Act 1945 to mitigate and prevent land degradation throu

  • Regulation 6 of the Soil and Land Conservation Regulations 1992 applies to all types of drainage, including groundwater pumping, within the Peel–Harvey Catchment Area.

  • Dryland salinity is one of the greatest environmental threats facing Western Australia's agricultural land, water, biodiversity and infrastructure.