Soil salinity

Dryland salinity is a major form of land degradation. More than one million hectares of broadacre farmland in Western Australia is estimated to be currently affected by dryland salinity. The department can provide the technical information needed to assist landholders and the community to diagnose the extent and effect of salinity along with mitigation strategies. Through activities such as groundwater and soil analysis, landholders can confidently assess salinity risks and implement appropriate management responses.

Articles

  • Saline lands in Western Australia (WA) often suffer winter waterlogging, with the levels of salinity and depth to watertable varying markedly both spatially and between seasons.

  • To make sound decisions on managing saline sites, you need to know the source of salt, how salinisation is occurring, the landscape context, and most importantly, the actual salt concentration of t

  • More than 1 million hectares of land in the south-west of Western Australia is severely affected by dryland salinity.

  • Reforestation, afforestation and revegetation can sequester significant amounts of carbon per hectare.

  • Members of the public can lodge a complaint about observed land management with the Commissioner of Soil and Land Conservation in Western Australia, and the Commissioner will then investigate the c

  • Dryland salinity is one of the greatest environmental threats facing Western Australia's agricultural land, water, biodiversity and infrastructure.

  • Permanent raised beds are a practical and economic means of managing some waterlogged sites in wetter areas of the Western Australian grainbelt.

  • Salt is a natural component of land, water and ecological systems in Western Australia. Large areas of naturally saline land (primary salinity) were present before European settlement.

  • Poor weed and pea germination due to wet saline soil

    Field peas are sensitive to waterlogging and moderately sensitive to soil salinity. Soil salinity affects plant growth by reducing the roots ability to extract water from the soil.

  • Reduced emergence and smaller plants that die earlier near saline areas

    Salinity affects plant growth by reducing the root's ability to extract water from the soil. Salinity damage varies from season to season due to variations in the soil salt concentration.