Land use

Western Australia is the largest Australian State, spanning 2 400 kilometres from north to south, and experiencing a variety of climatic conditions, soil and land properties, and water availability. Accordingly, the state is suited to a variety of agricultural industries ranging from open range grazing and broadacre cereal cropping through to irrigated pastures and horticulture, orchards and vineyards.

The Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia provides the advice, support and tools needed to ensure the State’s land has the capability to sustain agricultural use, without degrading the soil and water resources on which it relies, and to ensure our most valuable agricultural land is protected from non-agricultural development. 

Articles

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) identifies high quality agricultural land (HQAL) using a methodology that combines land and water resource information, to high

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development works with the land-use planning system to ensure that land and water resources are available for agriculture and food businesses to ex

  • Landowners who wish to protect and manage native vegetation on their property may enter into an agreement (covenant) with the Commissioner of Soil and Land Conservation under s30 of the Soil an

  • Land conservation district committees (LCDCs) are statutory committees appointed by the Commissioner of Soil and Land Conservation in Western Australia, to administer land conservation districts in

  • Members of the public can lodge a complaint about observed land management with the Commissioner of Soil and Land Conservation in Western Australia, and the Commissioner will then investigate the c

  • Legislation regulating the poultry industry covers a wide array of issues ranging from disease control, food health and safety, the environment (odour and noise emissions), to agricultural chemical

  • Reforesting previously cleared farming land with permanent environmental plantings can potentially earn carbon credits for the carbon stored in the trees and litter.

  • Agriculture is an integral component of the economic, social and cultural landscape in the Swan Valley.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development provides advice and information to land-use planners to help them consider the needs of agriculture and food sectors in their decisions

  • Land capability assessment is used to identify the potential for agricultural and non-agricultural land uses. It considers specific requirements of the land use and also identifies potenti