Climate & weather

Enabling farm businesses to better manage the increasing seasonal variability is critical for the success of the Western Australian agrifood sector. The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development is enabling farm businesses to make more informed planning and financial decisions on weather and climate risks. These decisions range from short-term tactical decisions, through to managing strategic planning for climatic futures. The development of improved weather data and seasonal forecasting tools are designed to assist you to better manage and take full advantage of the opportunities related to seasonal variability and climate change.

The Department of Fire and Emergency Services has launched a new website; emergency.wa.gov.au. This website will replace the existing alerts and warnings websites from DFES and Parks and Wildlife, enabling people to get critical public information during fire, flood, storm, earthquake, tsunami and emergencies involving hazardous materials.

Articles

  • Frost is difficult to manage. It has a significant economic and emotional impact on the whole community.

  • Frost occurs on clear nights in early spring when the air temperature drops to 2°C or less.

  • Spring frosts occasionally cause drastic reductions in crop yields in localised parts of the Western Australian wheatbelt.

  • Frost risk occurs virtually every year across southern and eastern agricultural regions. Actual occurrence of frost is determined by location and landscape factors as well as climate.

  • The department is a key partner in the Grains Research and Development Corporations' (GRDC) National Frost Initiative (NFI) which aims to provide the Australian grains industry with targeted resear

  • A new guide has been published to assist cereal growers to identify frost damage and consider crop management decisions.

  • Anyone wanting to undertake a carbon farming project to sell carbon offsets has to use an approved methodology to account for the carbon sequestered.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development provides this agri-climate profile of historical and projected climate information to support farm business managers in their response

  • Western Australian agriculture experiences variability in its winter growing season (May–October): late starts, early finishes and 'dry seasons' with rainfall low enough to cause serious plant and

  • DAFWA provides data and information on current season through its network of automatic weather stations and seasonal climate forecasts through the Statistical Climate Information system.

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