Climate & weather

Enabling farm businesses to better manage the increasing seasonal variability is critical for the success of the Western Australian agrifood sector. The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development is enabling farm businesses to make more informed planning and financial decisions on weather and climate risks. These decisions range from short-term tactical decisions, through to managing strategic planning for climatic futures. The development of improved weather data and seasonal forecasting tools are designed to assist you to better manage and take full advantage of the opportunities related to seasonal variability and climate change.

The Department of Fire and Emergency Services has launched a new website; emergency.wa.gov.au. This website will replace the existing alerts and warnings websites from DFES and Parks and Wildlife, enabling people to get critical public information during fire, flood, storm, earthquake, tsunami and emergencies involving hazardous materials.

Articles

  • Cattle are common victims of fires in Australia. Cattle are generally less affected by fires than sheep because of their superior height and speed, but they can be severely burnt if trapped, such a

  • Sheep are common victims of fires in Australia. The information below describes how fire may affect sheep and the management options landholders have.

  • The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) provides this information to support managers and others suffering from the effects of fire on the farm.

  • Most unplanned fires have a drastic effect on a pasture. Fire changes the plant composition and reduces growth and carrying capacity in the following season.

  • Strong fires will cause significant damage to bush on farms and may devastate revegetation areas.

  • After farm fires, protect your water supply from contamination.

  • Following a fire, the risk of water erosion is greatly increased on bare paddocks.

  • Agistment is an option for removing livestock from a property, for a number of reasons – after a fire, when paddock feed is inadequate, to spell pastures, or to finish livestock for sale on better

  • Western Australia's (WA) climate has changed over the last century, particularly over the last 50 years. Average temperature has risen about 1°C.

  • Wind and water erosion risk is increased after fire removes groundcover and some seed reserves.