Carbon farming

Carbon farming is the process of changing agricultural practices or land use to increase the amount of carbon stored in the soil and vegetation (sequestration) and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from livestock, soil or vegetation (avoidance).
 
Carbon farming potentially offers landholders financial incentives to reduce carbon pollution, but should always aim to achieve multiple economic and environmental co-benefits. The Agriculture and Food Division of the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development can provide scientific assessments of the technical feasibility and risks, but anyone contemplating participating in carbon farming should seek appropriate legal and technical advice.

Articles

  • 11 April 2017

    Irrigation and changing land use and management in the Pilbara may provide land managers with more opportunities to participate in the carbon economy.

  • 9 August 2017

    Composting offers an environmentally superior alternative to using organic material for landfill because composting reduces methane production (a major source of greenhouse gas), and provides a ser

  • 22 August 2017

    As a signatory to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Australian Government conducts an annual inventory of the nation's sources and sinks of greenhouse gases. The 2015 i

  • 9 August 2017

    Salinity risk mapping provides managers with information to assess tree planting proposals for carbon sequestration.

  • 23 August 2017

    Carbon farming is the deliberate set of agricultural practices or land use to increase carbon stored in the soil and vegetation (sequestration) and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from livestock

  • 14 September 2017

    Strategic savanna fire management can be an integral part of rangeland enterprises to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in addition to protecting fodder and infrastructure, and potentially receiving

  • 14 September 2017

    Carbon farming through rangeland restoration has generally low sequestration potential per hectare, but potentially extensive environmental benefits.

  • 14 September 2017

    The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) uses the following definitions for terms used in our rangeland management publications.

  • 9 February 2017

    Western Australian farmers produce over 10 million tonnes of waste biomass every year and much of this will present commercial opportunities for new industries.

  • 22 August 2017

    The Agriculture and Food Division of the Department of Primary industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) provides information on carbon farming related policy, legislation and science, to identif

Pages

Filter by search

Filter by topic