Carbon farming: nutrition and feed additives to reduce methane emissions from sheep

Page last updated: Tuesday, 26 October 2021 - 12:52pm

Please note: This content may be out of date and is currently under review.

Improved grazing and feeding management of sheep can reduce methane emissions per unit of product (feed efficiency) or emissions per unit of feed intake (methane yield).

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development provides this information to support land manager decisions about investing in carbon farming.

Benefits of using nutrition and feed additives to reduce methane emissions from sheep

Carbon benefits with an approved methodology do not exist.

Co-benefit: this practice can potentially manipulate the quality of the end product (for example, prime lamb).

Opportunities to use feed additives:

  • This activity is relevant to all sheep enterprises in Western Australia.
    • In WA, about 2 million lambs are finished to slaughter weights each year, either as sucker lambs at weaning or after being finished in the paddock or feedlot.
  • Production feeding to increase lamb growth rates, and finish lambs for slaughter at a younger age, reduces the total methane produced per lamb.

Risks associated with using nutrition and feed additives to reduce methane emissions from sheep

  • No approved methodology exists.
  • Including canola oil in supplementary feed reduces methane emissions but also reduces profit.

Contact information

Mandy Curnow
+61 (0)8 9892 8422